What to Expect During an Eye Exam

If you have never had an eye exam before, then you may be a little nervous and not know what to expect on your first visit to the optometrist. By gaining a full understanding of what an eye exam consists of, then you can stay calm and remain confident on the day of the examination.

How an eye exam works

Although each eye exam may be slightly different depending on the optometrist and the patient’s exact needs, there are certain tasks that are a part of almost every eye exam. The following is a three-step process that most medical professionals follow when conducting an eye exam.

Determine medical history

The first step in the eye exam process is for the examiner to document the patient’s medical history, discussing anything relevant to eye health and any eye complications that the patient may have recently experienced. The patient is likely to be asked a series of questions, which may include inquiries about any family members who have developed an eye disease in the past if the patient is currently suffering from any eye conditions and more general questions about their overall health. This knowledge allows the examiner to gain a better understanding as to what exact eye exam tests are needed.

Eye exam tests

The eye exam tests performed may be different for each patient, but there are some that are more common. Almost every eye exam includes what is known as a visual acuity test, which measures the sharpness of the patient’s vision. Most people are familiar with and have received this form of exam — which often uses the famously known wall chart that contains various rows of letters. Tonometry, which measures the pressure in the eyes, is also a common procedure. In many instances, a pupil dilation test may be performed as well in order to see the internal structure of the eyes more clearly.

Evaluation and treatment

After the testing is complete and the results are available, the medical professional conducting the eye exam is likely to go over the results with the patient. If any eye complications were determined, she or he may recommend treatment to the patient, which can range from contacts or glasses to treatment for glaucoma and other more serious eye conditions. In the event that the patient’s eyes are healthy, the medical professional is likely to discuss preventive techniques to ensure a healthy eye exam on the next visit as well; these suggestions may include lifestyle or diet changes.

Schedule an eye exam today

It is important to receive consistent eye exams, regardless of if you experience any eye issues or not. The symptoms of many serious eye conditions can go unnoticed for a long time and cause the issue to be much harder to treat when more noticeable symptoms develop. A skilled optometrist is able to identify the earliest signs of eye disease and other serious eye complications, in addition to helping patients see and feel better every day. If you are in need of an eye exam, then feel free to consult with us today and schedule a time to come in for a visit.

Request an appointment here: https://brighteyesny.com or call Bright Eyes Optometry at (914) 730-9574 for an appointment in our New Rochelle office.

Check out what others are saying about our services on Yelp: Read our Yelp reviews.

Recent Posts

Guide To Regular Visits To The Optometrist

A yearly visit to the optometrist may be something that gets put off. It may happen once due to a schedule conflict and then becomes easier to push to the wayside. People may assume there is no rush because the eyesight seems fine, so there may be little obvious reason to get that initial visit…

What You Need To Know About Diabetic Eye Exams

A diabetic eye exam can be a life and vision saver for a diabetic. Diabetes is a serious disease and one that can be difficult to manage. Medication, proper diet and exercise, and regular medical care can be helpful for controlling blood sugar levels and reducing serious damage to the body. In spite of best efforts,…

Eggs Florentine Anyone? — The Importance Of Lutein And Zeaxanthin

Lutein and zeaxanthin are yellow and red pigments found in yummy vegetables that we eat. Lutein is used in the retina to protect the eye tissue from sun damage. Think of it as an internal layer of sunscreen to protect the center of the vision in the human eye from degenerative aging due to sun…

Geckos Lick But We Don't — Dry Eye

It is surprising to think that watery eyes are sign of dry eyes but they are! Ever see a gecko lick its eyes? Well, those animals don’t have eyelids so they have to keep the skin of the eyes moist by licking them. If they don’t lick then they can’t see, because the skin of…

Recent Posts

Guide To Regular Visits To The Optometrist

Guide To Regular Visits To The Optometrist

A yearly visit to the optometrist may be something that gets put off. It may happen once due to a schedule conflict and then becomes easier to push to the wayside. People may assume there is no rush because the eyesight seems fine, so there may be little obvious reason to get that initial visit…

What You Need To Know About Diabetic Eye Exams

What You Need To Know About Diabetic Eye Exams

A diabetic eye exam can be a life and vision saver for a diabetic. Diabetes is a serious disease and one that can be difficult to manage. Medication, proper diet and exercise, and regular medical care can be helpful for controlling blood sugar levels and reducing serious damage to the body. In spite of best efforts,…